Nguyen Orthodontics

DR HUY D. NGUYEN Certified Specialist in Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics

509-1110 Sheppard Ave E, Toronto ON Canada M2K 2W2    Tel:416-222-5580

Introduction

What is Orthodontics?

Orthodontics, orthodontia, or orthodonture (from Greek orthos "straight or proper"; and odous "tooth") is the first specialty of dentistry that is concerned with the study and treatment of malocclusions (improper bites), which may be a result of tooth irregularity, disproportionate jaw relationships, or both. Orthodontic treatment can focus on dental displacement only, or can deal with the control and modification of facial growth. In the latter case it is better defined as "dentofacial orthopaedics".



What is an Orthodontist?

Orthodontists are specialists in moving teeth and aligning jaws.
 
All orthodontists are dentists first. Out of 100 dental school graduates, only six go on to become orthodontists.
 
There are three steps in an orthodontist's education: college, dental school and orthodontic residency program. It can take 10 or more years of education after high school to become an orthodontist. After completing college requirements, the prospective orthodontist attends dental school. Upon graduation, the future orthodontist must be accepted as a student in an accredited orthodontic residency program, then successfully complete a minimum of two academic years of study. The orthodontic student learns the skills required to manage tooth movement (orthodontics) and guide facial development (dentofacial orthopedics).
toronto orthodontics
  • Only those who have successfully completed this formal education may call themselves "orthodontists."
  • Orthodontists limit their scope of work to orthodontics only.
  • Orthodontists are uniquely qualified in the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of orthodontic problems. They dedicate their professional lives to creating healthy, beautiful smiles in children, teens and adults. Well-aligned teeth are more than attractive: they make it possible to bite, chew and speak effectively. Orthodontic care is often part of a comprehensive oral health plan.
  • Orthodontists use a variety of "appliances," including braces, clear aligner trays and retainers, to move teeth or hold them in their new positions. Because of orthodontists' advanced education and clinical experience, they have the knowledge and skills necessary to recommend the best kind of appliance to meet every individual patient's treatment goals.
  • Only orthodontists are eligible for membership in the American Association of Orthodontists

Methods

For comprehensive orthodontic treatment, most commonly, metal wires are inserted into orthodontic brackets, which can be made from stainless steel or a more aesthetic ceramic material. The wires interact with the brackets to move teeth into the desired positions. Other methods may include invisalign. Invisalign consists of clear plastic aligners that allow you to realign your teeth without others seeing how your teeth are moving.

Dental braces, with a powerchain, removed after completion of treatment. Additional components - including removable appliances ("plates"), headgear, expansion appliances, and many other devices - may also be used to move teeth and jaw bones. Functional appliances, for example, are used in growing patients (age 5 to 14) with the aim of modifying the jaw dimensions and relationship if these are altered. This therapy, termed Dentofacial Orthopedics, is frequently followed by fixed multibracket therapy ("full braces") to align the teeth and refine the occlusion.

Orthodontic treatment can help fix your teeth and set them in the right place. Orthodontists usually use braces and retainers to set your teeth. There are, however, orthodontists who work on reconstructing the entire face rather than focusing exclusively on teeth.

After a course of active orthodontic treatment, patients will typically wear retainers, which maintain the teeth in their improved positions while surrounding bone reforms around them. The retainers are generally worn full-time for a short period, perhaps six months to a year, then part-time (typically, nightly during sleep) for as long as the orthodontist recommends.

It is possible for the teeth to stay aligned without regular retainer wear. However, there are many reasons teeth will crowd as a person ages, whether or not the individual ever experienced orthodontic treatment; thus there is no guarantee that teeth will stay aligned without retention. For this reason, many orthodontists prescribe part-time retainer wear for many years after orthodontic treatment.

Diagnosis and treatment planning

In diagnosis and treatment planning, the orthodontist must:
  • recognize the various characteristics of a malocclusion or dentofacial deformity;
  • define the nature of the problem, including the etiology if possible;
  • design a treatment strategy based on the specific needs and desires of the individual; and
  • present the treatment strategy to the patient in such a way that the patient fully understands the ramifications of his/her decision.

Parents Guide to Orthodontics

Thinking about your child and whether orthodontic treatment might be needed at some point? You’ve come to the right place. Orthodontic treatment can be a very important part of your child’s oral health care.

Please visit Parents Guide to Orthodontics from American Association of Orthodontists website for more information.



 
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